sonic boom orao marjan jelen sound barrier

BREAKING THE SOUND BARRIER LIKE GALLOPING  A HORSE

“You are not normal, that is not allowed,” responded the wife of a test pilot Marjan Jelen when he came home that day. Not having it among his tasks, yet believing in the aircraft J-22 Orao, Marjan Jelen was the first to break the sound barrier on November 11, 1984, with the speed of Mach 1.04 with a Yugoslav-made plane. DUTY TO TRY Test pilots are known to have an internal need for pushing boundaries. Joining their love for calculated risk with practicality, they end up testing aircraft in many different ways for the safety of those who follow. Pushing Read more…

DON´T FIGHT THE NATURE (addendum)

I wish the crew of the doomed Cessna Skyline, which departed from the Split airport on Sunday 29th May, read my story, published on Friday. I wish they had learned from similar accidents in the past. Again, the stage was set for the perfect storm: weekend flight to the seaside, the passage of a cold front predicted well in advance, getting-home-itis in the cockpit, and the least suitable route selected for flight back. The fact, that weather was rather good at the departure airport, was just one of the things, that kept tunneling the pilot’s mental picture of what they Read more…

sky aviators hangar blog

DON´T FIGHT THE NATURE (you will lose)

Aviate, navigate, communicate. Flying, like any “unnatural” human activity, is inherently dangerous. But ever-stricter safety measures, principles, and regulations, which are in place almost from the dawn of aviation, have to large extent prevented many accidents or catastrophes from happening. Time after time single most frequent reason for them happening nevertheless, proved to be the so-called human factor, a politically correct synonym for breaking the rules. Be it due to stupidity, lack of knowledge, gambling, or simple arrogance and overestimating of piloting skills. There were incidents and even catastrophes where the underlying cause was of technical nature, but the battle Read more…

BE KIND

There is a longstanding tradition of gliding in this part of the world. Something partially thanks to state-sponsored aeroclubs, as technical culture was cherished and supported in socialist times. Many, who otherwise would not be able to afford to pay for flight training, got it for free. Flying is therefore still deeply rooted as one of the cornerstones of the technical culture (unfortunately deteriorating fast). Fun fact – the first few generations of air traffic controllers were almost all more or less connected to aviation in one way or another, many also glider and sports pilots. Air traffic control is Read more…

Josip Križaj Pepi letalski as hangar blog

JOSIP KRIŽAJ -PEPI

Brave life of the Slovenian Aviation Ace Josip Križaj was a pilot of four air forces: the Kingdom of Italy, the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, the Air Force of the Spanish Republic (F.A.R.E. ), and post-war Yugoslavia (FNRY). He was posthumously awarded the Golden Aviation Badge, which was awarded only to the best Yugoslav pilots in recognition of his superior training and outstanding achievements in flying. PASSION TO FLYJosip often spent his childhood in the company of Austrian soldiers during the First World War. After the disintegration of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy, this part of Primorska belonged to Italy, and Kopriva was Read more…

NEVER, EVER GIVE UP (Part two)

It is hot and humid early afternoon. I was working as an executive air traffic controller at Ljubljana Approach, meaning I was responsible for airplanes departing and landing from and to Ljubljana airport and all neighboring airports (Zagreb, Pula, Klagenfurt, Graz, and others). Traffic was a bit lazy, partially it was due to the cold front just passing over, causing havoc in the air. Huge swollen Cb clouds everywhere, strong winds and rain, occasionally with hail are not appealing for pleasure flying or flying in general.I had only a few aircraft on my frequency, all avoiding clouds and trying to Read more…

branko bunderla libis 180

PATHWAY TO LIBIS 180

The pathway to get the only remaining aircraft of its type to fly again started a very long time ago. In honor of Slovenian aviation heritage and to remember how much love and hard work is needed to preserve such an airplane, we present you Libis 180. ESTABLISHMENT OF THE FIRST AEROCLUBS  The rich history of Slovenian aviation began with the establishment of the aeroclub “Our Wings” in the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes in Belgrade. With the help of the newspaper “Naša krila”, which began publishing in 1924, aviation became extremely widespread and aviation was gaining more and Read more…

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